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Hilary Zelson

Hilary Zelson

Hilary Zelson is a public artist based in Waltham, MA, with five years of experience implementing site-responsive public art projects. She believes public art is a way to engage an everyday site with new meaning, allow a passerby to make a new discovery, stimulate imaginative and reflective experiences, and give a community creative ownership of a place. In 2017, Hilary installed two public artworks: Winter Blooms, in Coolidge Corner, Brookline, MA, and Spectacle Butterfly, at the Nashville International Airport, in Nashville, TN. Other notable projects include Rainbow Rooster, at Cambridge Ellis Preschool, in Cambridge, MA, Who Wears Wool, in Fort Point Channel, Boston, MA, and Community Arts Initiative Artist Project: Elemental, at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA. Her work has been featured in, among others, The Boston Globe, Wicked Local Brookline, Metro Boston, Brookline Patch, Nashville Arts Magazine, Boston Magazine, Boston.com, The Jewish Advocate, and The Improper Bostonian.

In 2016, Hilary began working as the Public Art Administrator for the Cambridge Arts Council, The Official Arts Agency for the City of Cambridge, MA. As the Public Art Administrator, Hilary is responsible for coordinating the logistics, education, and outreach for numerous public art projects. This includes tasks such as the development of a new grant program, building community and school partnerships, and planning for both temporary and permanent public art projects. She also helps manage

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PHOTOS

  • Spectacle Butterfly

VIDEOS

  • Who Wears Wool is a site-specific installation located in Fort Point Channel that references the history of Boston’s Fort Point Neighborhood. The history and influence of Boston’s wool trade is largely unknown, yet the cycle of its rise and fall parallels key contemporary issues. Through a comedic lens, the artwork hints at gentrification, class structure, sustainability, outsourcing locally versus overseas, environmentalism, consumerism, and the shift of industrial production from natural handmade materials to inexpensive synthetic materials.

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